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Undergraduates

D. Reid Weedon, Jr. '41 Alumni/ae Relations Award

The D. Reid Weedon, Jr. ’41 Alumni/ae Relations Award is presented to the fraternity, sorority, or independent living group that has promoted the greatest interactions between its members and alumni.

For a more complete description and to nominate an organization for the D. Reid Weedon, Jr. '41 Alumni/ae Relations Award please visit the Alumni Association webpage.

Past Winners

2019

  • First Place - Sigma Kappa
  • Second Place - Delta Phi Epsilon

2018

  • First Place - Sigma Chi
  • Second Place - Phi Beta Epsilon
  • Honorable Mention - Delta Phi Epsilon
  • Honorable Mention - Delta Tau Delta

2017

  • First Place - Sigma Kappa
  • Second Place - Delta Tau Delta
  • Third Place - Theta Tau

2016

  • First Place- Zeta Beta Tau
  • Second Place – Zeta Psi
  • Honorable Mention Phi Beta Epsilon and Alpha Delta Phi

2015

  • First Place- Zeta Beta Tau
  • Second Place – Alpha Chi Omega
  • Honorable Mention – Phi Beta Epsilon

2014

  • First Place- Alpha Chi Omega
  • Second Place – Zeta Psi
  • Honorable Mention – Sigma Kappa

2013

  • First Place- Alpha Chi Omega
  • Second Place - Chi Phi
  • Honorable Mention - Kappa Sigma
  • Honorable Mention - Sigma Chi

2012

  • Kappa Alpha Theta
  • Theta Delta Chi
 

D. Reid Weedon, Jr. graduated from MIT in 1941 with an S.B. in engineering. Throughout his long life, he worked tirelessly as a volunteer on behalf of MIT and with the Alumni Association, continuing right up through and well past his 90th birthday. Mr. Weedon was a past president of the Alumni Association, held most of the major offices in the Association, and provided leadership for various Association activities. In addition, Mr. Weedon was a leader in the MIT Alumni Interfraternity Conference and was a founder of MIT’s Independent Residence Fund, which helps independent living groups renovate and improve their facilities. He was first an alumni member and later a life member of the MIT Corporation. He died at his home in Cohasset, Massachusetts, on November 2, 2016 at the age of 96. 

 

Betsy Schumacker Woman Athlete of the Year Award

The Betsy Schumacher Woman Athlete of the Year Award is presented annually to an undergraduate woman for excellence in athletic competition.

If you have any questions about the Betsy Schumacker Woman Athlete of the Year Award please contact via email.

Past Winners

2019

  • Devon Goetz '20

2018

  • Emily Penn '18

2017

  • Veronika Jedryka ‘17

2016

  • Cimran Virdi ‘16

2015

  • Cimran Virdi ‘16

2014

  • Cimran Virdi ‘16

2013

  • Molly McShane

2012

  • Kameron Klauber

 

The complete lists of past winners.

 

Mary Elizabeth “Betsy” Schumacker, born in Devon, Pennsylvania, earned an S.B. in mathematics at MIT in 1960. During her undergraduate years, she was a competitive swimmer, receiving the Sports Illustrated “Pat-on-the-Back Award” in 1958, and holding two Middle Atlantic women’s records and one National Junior women’s record. She returned to MIT in 1966, where she taught civil engineering and urban systems for 17 years.

 

Irwin Sizer Award for the Most Significant Improvement to MIT Education

The Irwin Sizer Award is presented to any member or group in the Institute community to honor significant innovations and improvements to MIT education. The award is named in honor of Irwin W. Sizer, Dean of the Graduate School from 1967-1975.

To nominate, visit the Graduate Student Council website. Please direct any questions to gsc-awards@mit.edu.

Past Winners

2019

  • Lee David Perlman and Carole Cafferty, Educational Justice Institute at MIT

2018

  • Dr. Chris Caplice, Dr. Eva Ponce Cueto, and the Supply Chain Management MicroMasters/Blended Master's Program Team

2017

  • Was not awarded

2016

  • Prof. Tom Leighton, Mathematics
  • Dean Michael Sipser, Mathematics

2015

  • Dr. Lee Perlman, MIT Concourse Learning Program

2014

  • Dr. Robert Tong-Ik Shin, Lincoln Laboratory

2013

  • Prof. J. Meejin Yoon, Department of Architecture
 

Irwin Whiting Sizer, a pioneer in molecular biology and champion of the recruitment of women and minority students, taught at MIT for over 60 years. He joined the MIT faculty in 1935 as an instructor in the Department of Biology and was named chair of the department in 1956, a position he held until 1967 when he was appointed dean of the graduate school. Sizer served as dean until 1976, when he returned to the Department of Biology as professor emeritus and instructor. He was instrumental in the development of many programs at MIT, including Whitaker College, the joint Ph.D. in oceanography at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology Program, and the introduction of interdisciplinary master’s degrees. Within the Department of Biology, he played a major role in the evolution of the biology curriculum from a classical program to a modern molecular biology program.

 

Frederick Gardner Fassett, Jr. Award

The Frederick Gardiner Fasset, Jr. Award is presented annually to up to three individual members of the FSILG Community, one from each of the three student councils, who have most unselfishly demonstrated the qualities of spirit, dedication, and service in furthering the ideals of MIT brotherhood, sisterhood, and membership excellence.

To nominate, visit the FSILG Office website.

Past Winners

2019

  • Kate Nelson '19
  • Dan Monagle '20
  • Luke Sciarappa '19

2018

  • Miranda McClellan '18
  • Emma Costa '18
  • William Caruso '18

2017

  • Evelyn Florentine '18
  • Scott McCuen '18
  • John Gordon '18

2016

  • Taylor Rose '16
  • Sasha Crandall Fleischman '18
  • Obasi Onuohua '17

2015

  • Daniel Wang
  • Yasmin Inam
  • Erin Main

2014

  • Philine Huizing ‘14
  • Haldun Anil ‘15
  • Eva “Niki” Edmonds ‘15

2013

  • Lauren Allen ‘13
  • Tommy Anderson ‘13
  • Daniel Fremont ‘13

2012

  • Eyas Alsharaiha ’13
  • Denzil Sikka ’13
  • Tim Stumbaugh '12
 

Frederick Gardiner Fassett, Jr. came to MIT in 1930 as an instructor in the departments of English and History, becoming an assistant professor in 1934 and associate professor in 1938. He was appointed associate dean of students in 1952 and in 1956 was appointed the Institute’s first dean of residence. A natural friend and confidant of students since his days as a young instructor, Dean Fassett worked unremittingly throughout his years at MIT to improve the quality of student life on campus.

 

Karl Taylor Compton Prize

The Karl Taylor Compton Prizes are the highest awards presented by the Institute to students and student organizations in recognition of excellent achievements in citizenship and devotion to the welfare of MIT.

If you have any questions about the Compton Prizes please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2019

  • Orpheus Chatzivasileiou G
  • Neil Gaikwad G
  • René García Franceschini '19

2018

  • Miranda McClellan '18
  • Officers of the Graduate Student Council
  • Interfraternity Council Sexual Misconduct Committee

2017

  • Michael McCellan G

2016

  • Matthew Davis '16
  • Sebastian Schmidt G

2015

  • Jane He
  • Mitali Thakor

2014

  • Anna Ho ‘14
  • Leonid Grinberg ‘14
  • Patrick Hulin ‘14

2013

  • Amanda David '13
  • Ellan Spero G
  • Graduate Student Council

2012

  • Patrick Barragan '08
  • Paul Kominers '12
  • Gordon Wintrob '12
 

Dr. Karl Taylor Compton was president of MIT from 1930-1948 and chairman of the MIT Corporation from 1948 until his death in 1954. Born in Ohio in 1887, President Compton attended the College of Wooster, earning a B.S. (1908) and an M.S. (1909) in physics, and was awarded a Ph.D. in physics in 1912 from Princeton University. Compton was head of President Roosevelt’s Office of Scientific Research and Development during World War II, overseeing the development of radar in MIT’s Radiation Lab. He received the highest civilian honor of the U.S. Army, the Medal for Merit, for helping to shorten the war. Noted throughout his life for his uncompromising integrity and his generous public spirit, Compton’s strong leadership transformed the Institute into one of the world’s leading research universities.

 

Laya and Jerome B. Wiesner Student Art Awards

The Laya and Jerome B. Wiesner Student Art Awards are presented annually to up to four students (undergraduate or graduate), living groups, organizations or activities for outstanding achievement in and contributions to the arts at MIT. Established by the Council for the Arts at MIT in 1979, these awards honor Jerome B. Wiesner, MIT President 1971-1980, and his wife Laya Wiesner for their commitment to the arts at MIT.

An endowment fund provides a $2,000 award to each recipient. Learn more about the Laya & Jerome Wiesner Student Art Awards on the Arts at MIT website.

If you have any questions about the Laya & Jerome Wiesner Student Art Awards, please contact us via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2019

  • Amalia Lee '19
  • Pip Mothersill G
  • Garrett Souza '19
  • Gary Zhang G

2018

  • Laura Genes G
  • Adam Haar Horowitz G
  • Julia Rue '18
  • Tal Scully '18

2017

  • Jake Gunter '17
  • Nathan Gutierrez '17
  • Rachel Osmunsen '17
  • Hallie Voulgaris '17

2016

  • Angel Chia Ling Chen G
  • Sam Fomon '16
  • Samantha Harper '16

2015

  • Anne Meredith Macmillan G
  • Otto Briner '15
  • Majdolen Khweis '15
  • Michael Stern G

2014

  • Elly Jessop G
  • Adam Strandberg '14
  • Floor van de Velde G
  • Grace Young '14

2013

  • Noah Arbesfeld '13
  • Jean Sack '13
  • Festival Jazz Ensemble
  • Senior House

2012

  • Leah Brunetto '12
  • Farré Nixon '12
  • Dylan Sherry '12
 

Jerome B. Wiesner was President of MIT from 1971 to 1980. Wiesner’s career at MIT started in 1942 at the WWII Radiation Laboratory, where he worked on the development of radar. He served as professor of electrical engineering, director of the Research Laboratory of Electronics, dean of the School of Science, and provost. He became an institute professor in 1962. While on leave from MIT from 1961–1964, he served as special assistant for science and technology to U.S. Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. In his educational and leadership roles at MIT, Wiesner actively promoted and enriched the Institute’s programs in social science, humanities, and the arts, and the Council for the Arts was organized during his presidency. President Wiesner was a life member of the MIT Corporation from 1980 until his death in 1994.

 

 

 

Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts

The Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts is presented annually to a graduating senior who has demonstrated excellence or the highest standards of proficiency in music, theater, painting, sculpture, design, architecture or film. The Prize was established in 1982 by Mr. Sudler, a performer in the arts and an arts patron from Chicago.

An endowment fund provides a $2,500 award to the honoree. Learn more about the Sudler Prize in the Arts on the Arts at MIT website.

If you have any questions about the Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts Award please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2019

  • Grace Yin '19

2018

  • Bertrand Stone '18

2017

  • Garrett Parrish ‘17

2016

  • Daniel Joseph Parker '16

2015

  • Peter Godart '15

2014

  • Albert Wu ’14

2013

  • Emily Su ‘13

2012

  • Benjamin Bloomberg '12

The complete lists of past winners.

 

Louis Sudler (1903–1992) was never a student, faculty member, or member of the MIT staff. He nevertheless established a Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts at MIT, as well as at Yale, Harvard, Princeton, Dartmouth, Columbia, Johns Hopkins, the University of Chicago, Michigan State, Oberlin, Purdue, Duke, Emory, Rice, and Stanford. Sudler’s personal commitment to music and the encouragement of young musicians was lifelong. He performed nationwide as a soloist, and was a leading baritone with the Chicago Civic Opera. From 1960 until 1974, he was the producer and host of the Peabody Award-winning television show “Artists’ Showcase,” which presented over 500 young musical artists with orchestral accompaniment. In 1966, Mr. Sudler became the president of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and, in 1971, its chairman.

Patrick J. McGovern, Jr ’59 Entrepreneurship Award

In 2001, Patrick J. McGovern, Jr. ’59, working through the MIT Entrepreneurship Center, established the McGovern Entrepreneurship Award to be presented annually to an individual student or student team that has made a significant impact on the quality, visibility, and overall spirit of entrepreneurship education and support across the Institute.

Any MIT student or student team is eligible for this Award that honors Mr. McGovern, an accomplished entrepreneur, life member of the MIT corporation, and major contributor to the Institute community.

If you have any questions about the Patrick J. McGovern, Jr ’59 Entrepreneurship Award please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2019

  • Anthony Cheng '20 and Adam Xing Liang Zhao '19 of StartLabs Undergraduate Leadership Team

2018

  • Ingrid Oelschlager G
  • Gregory Ekchian G

2017

  • Jacob Loewwenstein G
  • Helen Smith G

2016

  • Alessandra Henderson G
  • Natalie Pitcher G
  • Liz Voeller G
  • Isaac Stoner G

2015

  • Dan Elitzer G & Jeremy Rubin '16 - MIT Bitcoin Project
  • Carlos Sánchez Altable - FinTech and Financial Innovation at MIT

2014

  • Andrea Ippolito G

2013

  • Elliot Cohen G, Allen Cheng G, Allison Yost G - Hacking Medicine
  • William F. Whitney ’13 - StartLabs
  • Colin Sidoti ’14 - Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Support and Outreach

2012

  • Akshar Wunnava '14
  • Application of Advanced Entrepreneurial Techniques 15.S24
 

Patrick J. McGovern, Jr. earned an S.B. in quantitative biology from MIT in 1959. His interest in life sciences focused especially on neurophysiology and the organization and function of the human nervous system. In 1964, he founded International Data Group, which grew into the world’s leading computer publishing firm responsible for hundreds of newspapers and magazines with a truly global reach. Mr. McGovern has maintained close ties with the Institute and has been a member of the MIT Corporation since 1989. In 2001, he and his wife Lore Harp McGovern became the largest donors ever to MIT with their pledge of $350 million to create and launch the McGovern Institute for Brain Research. In all his endeavors, Mr. McGovern has encouraged innovative methods for making high-tech ventures successful.

Priscilla King Gray Awards for Public Service

Recognize students who are building a better world

Honoring Priscilla King Gray’s contributions to public service at MIT, the award recognizes graduate and undergraduate students who are exceptionally dedicated to community engagement and making positive social and environmental changes at MIT and beyond.

Students recognized by this award demonstrate an outstanding personal dedication to social change, long-term and in-depth involvement in public service, and lead initiatives that strengthen our community.

The award was established by the Undergraduate Association in collaboration with the Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center to recognize undergraduate students. In recent years, the Graduate Student Council joined as a co-sponsor to honor graduate students as well.

For questions about the Priscilla King Gray Awards for Public Service, please email us at awards-gray@mit.edu.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2019

  • Sarah Tress '19
  • Lisa Volpatti G

2018

  • Yazmin Guzman '18
  • Helena Ma '19

2017

  • Aditi Mehta G
  • Vaishnavi Rao ‘17

2016

  • Paula Ruiz Castillo G
  • Shivangi Goel '17
  • Emily Keeley '17

2015

  • Shilpa Agrawal '15
  • Sofia Essayan-Perez '15
  • Stacey Allen G
  • William Li G

2014

  • Jean-Philippe Coutu G
  • Sherry Fu ‘14

2013

  • Camila Caballero ‘13

2012

  • Noam Angrist ’13
  • Hamsika Chandrasekar ’13
  • Stephanie Lin '12
  • Sravanthi Puranam '13
 

Priscilla King Gray, wife of former President Paul E. Gray, has been a highly active and dedicated presence at the Institute. While serving from 1980 to 1990 as MIT’s First Lady, she entertained an estimated 80,000 guests at the President’s house and initiated the popular and successful Senior Dinner. Her rich contributions to Institute life, however, both precede and postdate her period as First Lady. She helped develop the Freshman Advising System, was involved in the Technology Children’s Center, served on the MIT Medical Advisory Board, worked with the MIT Women’s League, and taught crewel embroidery. She was a founding co-chair of the Public Service Center Steering Committee.

John S.W. Kellett '47 Award

The John S. W. Kellett ’47 Award recognizes any MIT individual or group for an exceptional and/or sustained commitment to creating a more welcoming environment at MIT, including but not limited to, improving the experience of lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender (LBGT), and questioning individuals.

The award honors Mr. Kellett, whose spirited support has enabled significant improvements in the lives of members of MIT’s LBGT community.

If you have any questions about the John S.W. Kellett '47 Award please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2019

  • Professor Sasha Costanza-Chock, Comparative Media Studies/Writing

2018

  • Kenny Chen G

2017

  • Queer West

2016

  • Graduate Queer Women Group
    • Rebecca Heywood ’12 G
    • Audra Amasino G
    • Lakshmi Kannan G

2015

  • Margaret Lattanzi-Silveus ‘16

2014

  • Lincoln Laboratory Out Professional Employee Network (OPEN)

2013

  • Idan A. Blank G

2012

  • Cory Hernandez '14
 

John S. W. Kellett was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1927 and earned both an S.B. in chemical engineering (1947) and an S.M. in chemical engineering practice (1948) at MIT. He spent most of his career with Exxon focusing on refinery planning and project management. While he knew he was gay, he was closeted for most of his life. In 1972, when Exxon transferred him to Houston from overseas (the Stonewall Riots occurred during his absence and without his knowledge), he was determined to integrate the various aspects of his life and, later, to become an advocate for improving the experience of lesbian, bisexual, gay, and transgendered (LBGT) individuals. As his 50th reunion approached, he challenged MIT to examine its support of its LBGT community, resulting in the creation of the LBGT Issues Group, BGALA, and a broad spectrum of services. He continues to be a tireless advocate for these issues and an ongoing inspiration.

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