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Women & Minorities

Betsy Schumacker Woman Athlete of the Year Award

The Betsy Schumacher Woman Athlete of the Year Award is presented annually to an undergraduate woman for excellence in athletic competition.

If you have any questions about the Betsy Schumacker Woman Athlete of the Year Award please contact via email.

Past Winners

2017

  • Veronika Jedryka ‘17, Swimming and Diving

2016

  • Cimran Virdi ‘16

2015

  • Cimran Virdi ‘16

2014

  • Cimran Virdi ‘16

2013

  • Molly McShane, Field Hockey and Lacrosse

2012

  • Kameron Klauber, Field Hockey

 

The complete lists of past winners.

 

Mary Elizabeth “Betsy” Schumacker, born in Devon, Pennsylvania, earned an S.B. in mathematics at MIT in 1960. During her undergraduate years, she was a competitive swimmer, receiving the Sports Illustrated “Pat-on-the-Back Award” in 1958, and holding two Middle Atlantic women’s records and one National Junior women’s record. She returned to MIT in 1966, where she taught civil engineering and urban systems for 17 years.

 

Karl Taylor Compton Prize

The Karl Taylor Compton Prizes are the highest awards presented by the Institute to students and student organizations in recognition of excellent achievements in citizenship and devotion to the welfare of MIT.

If you have any questions about the Compton Prizes please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2017

  • Michael McCellan G

2016

  • Matthew Davis '16
  • Sebastian Schmidt G

2015

  • Jane He
  • Mitali Thakor

2014

  • Anna Ho ‘14
  • Leonid Grinberg ‘14
  • Patrick Hulin ‘14

2013

  • Amanda David '13
  • Ellan Spero G
  • Graduate Student Council

2012

  • Patrick Barragan '08
  • Paul Kominers '12
  • Gordon Wintrob '12
 

Dr. Karl Taylor Compton was president of MIT from 1930-1948 and chairman of the MIT Corporation from 1948 until his death in 1954. Born in Ohio in 1887, President Compton attended the College of Wooster, earning a B.S. (1908) and an M.S. (1909) in physics, and was awarded a Ph.D. in physics in 1912 from Princeton University. Compton was head of President Roosevelt’s Office of Scientific Research and Development during World War II, overseeing the development of radar in MIT’s Radiation Lab. He received the highest civilian honor of the U.S. Army, the Medal for Merit, for helping to shorten the war. Noted throughout his life for his uncompromising integrity and his generous public spirit, Compton’s strong leadership transformed the Institute into one of the world’s leading research universities.

 

John S.W. Kellett '47 Award

The John S. W. Kellett ’47 Award recognizes any MIT individual or group for an exceptional and/or sustained commitment to creating a more welcoming environment at MIT, including but not limited to, improving the experience of lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender (LBGT), and questioning individuals.

The award honors Mr. Kellett, whose spirited support has enabled significant improvements in the lives of members of MIT’s LBGT community.

If you have any questions about the John S.W. Kellett '47 Award please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2017

  • Queer West

2016

  • Graduate Queer Women Group
    • Rebecca Heywood ’12 G
    • Audra Amasino G
    • Lakshmi Kannan G

2015

  • Margaret Lattanzi-Silveus ‘16

2014

  • Lincoln Laboratory Out Professional Employee Network (OPEN)

2013

  • Idan A. Blank G

2012

  • Cory Hernandez '14
 

John S. W. Kellett was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1927 and earned both an S.B. in chemical engineering (1947) and an S.M. in chemical engineering practice (1948) at MIT. He spent most of his career with Exxon focusing on refinery planning and project management. While he knew he was gay, he was closeted for most of his life. In 1972, when Exxon transferred him to Houston from overseas (the Stonewall Riots occurred during his absence and without his knowledge), he was determined to integrate the various aspects of his life and, later, to become an advocate for improving the experience of lesbian, bisexual, gay, and transgendered (LBGT) individuals. As his 50th reunion approached, he challenged MIT to examine its support of its LBGT community, resulting in the creation of the LBGT Issues Group, BGALA, and a broad spectrum of services. He continues to be a tireless advocate for these issues and an ongoing inspiration.

Albert G. Hill Prize

The Albert G. Hill Prize is awarded to minority juniors or seniors who have maintained high academic standards and have made continued contributions to improving the quality of life for minorities at MIT.

If you have any questions about the Albert G. Hill Prize please contact via email. The deadline for nomination submissions is March 6.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2017

  • Kendrick Manymules ‘17
  • Joseff Kolman ‘17
  • Melissa Gianello ‘18
  • Carolina Fejgielman ‘17
  • Luzdary Ruelas ‘17
  • Tiera Guinn ‘17
  • Chris Harmon ‘17

2016 

  • Aaron Ashley '16
  • Paola Perez '17
  • Ronald Heisser '16
  • Alyssa Napier '16

2015

  • Estefania Avila-Anchondo ‘15
  • Markus Bradford '15
  • Dwyane George '15
  • Sarah McMillian '15
  • Ernesto Ramirez

2014

  • Eloho Akpovi ‘14
  • Bryan Collazo ‘14
  • Nathan Kipniss ‘14
  • Suan Tuang ‘14
  • Victoria “Ashley” Vilar ‘14

2013

  • Amanda Aparicio ‘14
  • Phillip H Daniel ‘13
  • Gustavo Goretkin ‘13
  • Victoria Okuneye ‘13
  • Evelyn Zuniga ‘13

2012

  • Brittany Jones ’12
  • Ken Lopez ’12
  • Kristen Peña ’12
  • Michael Thompson ’12

Albert Gordon Hill came to MIT in 1937 as an instructor in the department of physics. By the time of his retirement from MIT in 1978, he had held numerous administrative posts, including director of the Research Laboratory of Electronics, director of Lincoln Laboratory, MIT’s vice president for research, and director of the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. In addition, he served as a technical leader in the MIT Radiation Laboratory during World War II, and was the first chairman of the Charles Draper Laboratory. Professor Hill was an advocate for equal opportunity and affirmative action. He personally recruited African-American graduate students and faculty for the department of physics and was a member of the Task Force on Educational Opportunity, which proposed and organized the Office of Minority Education on campus.

 

Association of MIT Alumnae (AMITA) Senior Academic Award

The Association of MIT Alumnae Award is presented to an outstanding senior woman who has demonstrated the highest level of academic excellence through her coursework and related professional activities at MIT.

If you have any questions about the Association of MIT Alumnae (AMITA) Senior Academic Award please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

 

Past Winners

2017

  • Alyssa Cartwright ‘17
  • Vaishnavi Rao ‘17

2016

  • Ava Soleimany ‘16

2015

  • Andrea Kriz

2014

  • Arunima Balan ‘14

2013

  • Christie Chiu ‘13

2012

  • Kamena Kostova ’12

2011

  • Fatima Hussain ’11
  • Melissa Gymrek ’11

The complete lists of past winners.

Laya W. Wiesner Award

The Laya W. Wiesner Award honors Mrs. Wiesner’s contributions to women’s activities at the Institute. It was established in 1980 by the MIT Women’s League. The award is presented to the undergraduate woman student who has most enhanced MIT community life.

If you have any questions about the Laya W. Wiesner Award please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2017

  • Teresa de Figueiredo ’17

2016

  • Bettina Arkhurst ‘18

2015

  • Shivangi Goel ‘17

2014

  • Rachel H. Keeler

2013

  • Karine Yuki '13

2012

  • Vidya Eswaran '12
 

Laya Wainger Wiesner, wife of MIT’s President Jerome Wiesner, served as the Institute’s First Lady from 1971 to 1980. Mrs. Wiesner earned a B.S. in mathematics at the University of Michigan in 1940 and married in the same year. During the Wiesner presidency, Mrs. Wiesner was active in many Institute projects, including the MIT Women’s League, the MIT Advisory Committee on Women and Work, and the Advisory Board of MIT’s Child Development Center. She also worked to increase the number of women on the faculty. Beyond MIT, she helped found and support the Metropolitan Council on Education, was a leader of the Massachusetts League of Women Voters, and an active supporter of their efforts to aid the civil rights movement in the South.

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