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Student Organizations

Outstanding Event Award

This award is presented to a student organization, living group, or dorm for their efforts to plan and implement an event or series of events that are well developed, organized, and advertised.  Recipient’s events should have attracted individuals from across MIT and impacted student life at MIT in a considerable way.

Submit a nomination

2017

  • Tech Twinkles

Golden Beaver Award - Group

This award is presented to student organizations, living groups, dorms, or teams that show a strong organizational structure or government, that provide outstanding programming, and that have a significant impact on campus life at MIT. Recipients will have shown dedication to continually improving their group and enhancing the campus environment.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2017

  • Society of Women Engineers

2016

  • MIT European Club

 

 

Bridge Builder Award (Individual or Group)

This award is presented to students and/or student groups for a campaign, initiative, or program that has addressed a campus, local community, or global need and/or have demonstrated a strong commitment to and passion for diversity education and cultural celebration.  The recipient will have shown noteworthy collaboration and partnership between student organizations, living groups, dorms, teams, individual students, non-profit organizations, and/or governmental groups to raise awareness, share knowledge, provide solutions, and show commitment to social justice and a more inclusive MIT.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2017

  • Group): Language Conversation Exchange
  • (Individual): Caroline Mak ‘18

2016

  • Bettina Arkhurst ‘18

 

D. Reid Weedon, Jr. '41 Alumni/ae Relations Award

The D. Reid Weedon, Jr. ’41 Alumni/ae Relations Award is presented to the fraternity, sorority, or independent living group that has promoted the greatest interactions between its members and alumni.

For a more complete description and to nominate an organization for the D. Reid Weedon, Jr. '41 Alumni/ae Relations Award please visit the Alumni Association webpage.

Past Winners

2017

  • First Place - Sigma Kappa
  • Second Place - Delta Tau Delta
  • Third Place - Theta Tau

2016

  • First Place- Zeta Beta Tau
  • Second Place – Zeta Psi
  • Honorable Mention Phi Beta Epsilon and Alpha Delta Phi

2015

  • First Place- Zeta Beta Tau
  • Second Place – Alpha Chi Omega
  • Honorable Mention – Phi Beta Epsilon

2014

  • First Place- Alpha Chi Omega
  • Second Place – Zeta Psi
  • Honorable Mention – Sigma Kappa

2013

  • First Place- Alpha Chi Omega
  • Second Place - Chi Phi
  • Honorable Mention - Kappa Sigma
  • Honorable Mention - Sigma Chi

2012

  • Kappa Alpha Theta
  • Theta Delta Chi
 

Daniel Reid Weedon, Jr. graduated from MIT in 1941 with an S.B. in engineering. Since that time, he has worked tirelessly as a volunteer on behalf of MIT and with the Alumni Association. Mr. Weedon was a past president of the Alumni Association, held most of the major offices in the Association, and provided leadership for various Association activities. In addition, Mr. Weedon was a leader in the MIT Alumni Interfraternity Conference and was a founder of MIT’s Independent Residence Fund, which helps independent living groups renovate and improve their facilities. He was first an alumni member and later a life member of the MIT Corporation.

 

Irwin Sizer Award for the Most Significant Improvement to MIT Education

The Irwin Sizer Award is presented to any member or group in the Institute community to honor significant innovations and improvements to MIT education. The award is named in honor of Irwin W. Sizer, Dean of the Graduate School from 1967-1975.

To nominate, visit the Graduate Student Council website. Please direct any questions to gsc-awards@mit.edu.

Past Winners

2017

  • Was not awarded

2016

  • Prof. Tom Leighton, Mathematics
  • Dean Michael Sipser, Mathematics

2015

  • Dr. Lee Perlman, MIT Concourse Learning Program

2014

  • Dr. Robert Tong-Ik Shin, Lincoln Laboratory

2013

  • Prof. J. Meejin Yoon, Department of Architecture
 

Irwin Whiting Sizer, a pioneer in molecular biology and champion of the recruitment of women and minority students, taught at MIT for over 60 years. He joined the MIT faculty in 1935 as an instructor in the Department of Biology and was named chair of the department in 1956, a position he held until 1967 when he was appointed dean of the graduate school. Sizer served as dean until 1976, when he returned to the Department of Biology as professor emeritus and instructor. He was instrumental in the development of many programs at MIT, including Whitaker College, the joint Ph.D. in oceanography at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology Program, and the introduction of interdisciplinary master’s degrees. Within the Department of Biology, he played a major role in the evolution of the biology curriculum from a classical program to a modern molecular biology program.

 

Karl Taylor Compton Prize

The Karl Taylor Compton Prizes are the highest awards presented by the Institute to students and student organizations in recognition of excellent achievements in citizenship and devotion to the welfare of MIT.

If you have any questions about the Compton Prizes please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2017

  • Michael McCellan G

2016

  • Matthew Davis '16
  • Sebastian Schmidt G

2015

  • Jane He
  • Mitali Thakor

2014

  • Anna Ho ‘14
  • Leonid Grinberg ‘14
  • Patrick Hulin ‘14

2013

  • Amanda David '13
  • Ellan Spero G
  • Graduate Student Council

2012

  • Patrick Barragan '08
  • Paul Kominers '12
  • Gordon Wintrob '12
 

Dr. Karl Taylor Compton was president of MIT from 1930-1948 and chairman of the MIT Corporation from 1948 until his death in 1954. Born in Ohio in 1887, President Compton attended the College of Wooster, earning a B.S. (1908) and an M.S. (1909) in physics, and was awarded a Ph.D. in physics in 1912 from Princeton University. Compton was head of President Roosevelt’s Office of Scientific Research and Development during World War II, overseeing the development of radar in MIT’s Radiation Lab. He received the highest civilian honor of the U.S. Army, the Medal for Merit, for helping to shorten the war. Noted throughout his life for his uncompromising integrity and his generous public spirit, Compton’s strong leadership transformed the Institute into one of the world’s leading research universities.

 

Laya & Jerome Wiesner Art Award

The Laya and Jerome B. Wiesner Student Art Awards are presented annually to up to four students (undergraduate or graduate), living groups, organizations or activities for outstanding achievement in and contributions to the arts at MIT. Established by the Council for the Arts at MIT in 1979, these awards honor Jerome B. Wiesner, MIT President 1971-1980 and Mrs. Wiesner for their commitment to the arts at MIT.

An endowment fund provides a $2,000 honorarium to each recipient. Learn more about the Wiesner Student Art Awards on the Arts at MIT website.

If you have any questions about the Laya & Jerome Wiesner Art Award please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2017

  • Jake Gunter '17
  • Nathan Gutierrez '17
  • Rachel Osmunsen '17
  • Hallie Voulgaris '17

2016

  • Angel Chia Ling Chen G
  • Sam Fomon '16
  • Samantha Harper '16

2015

  • Anne Meredith Macmillan G
  • Otto Briner '15
  • Majdolen Khweis '15
  • Michael Stern G

2014

 

  • Elly Jessop G, Media Arts and Sciences
  • Adam Strandberg ’14, Physics
  • Floor van de Velde G, ACT
  • Grace Young ’14, Mechanical Engineering

2013

  • Noah Arbesfeld ‘13
  • Jean Sack ‘13
  • Festival Jazz Ensemble
  • Senior House

2012

  • Leah Brunetto '12
  • Farré Nixon '12
  • Dylan Sherry '12
 

Jerome B. Wiesner was President of MIT from 1971 to 1980. Wiesner’s career at MIT started in 1942 at the WWII Radiation Laboratory, where he worked on the development of radar. He served as professor of electrical engineering, director of the Research Laboratory of Electronics, dean of the School of Science, and provost. He became an institute professor in 1962. While on leave from MIT from 1961–1964, he served as special assistant for science and technology to U.S. Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. In his educational and leadership roles at MIT, Wiesner actively promoted and enriched the Institute’s programs in social science, humanities, and the arts, and the Council for the Arts was organized during his presidency. President Wiesner was a life member of the MIT Corporation from 1980 until his death in 1994.

 

 

 

Patrick J. McGovern, Jr ’59 Entrepreneurship Award

In 2001, Patrick J. McGovern, Jr. ’59, working through the MIT Entrepreneurship Center, established the McGovern Entrepreneurship Award to be presented annually to an individual student or student team that has made a significant impact on the quality, visibility, and overall spirit of entrepreneurship education and support across the Institute.

Any MIT student or student team is eligible for this Award that honors Mr. McGovern, an accomplished entrepreneur, life member of the MIT corporation, and major contributor to the Institute community.

If you have any questions about the Patrick J. McGovern, Jr ’59 Entrepreneurship Award please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2017

  • Jacob Loewwenstein G
  • Helen Smith G

2016

  • Alessandra Henderson G
  • Natalie Pitcher G
  • Liz Voeller G
  • Isaac Stoner G

2015

  • Dan Elitzer G & Jeremy Rubin '16 - MIT Bitcoin Project
  • Carlos Sánchez Altable - FinTech and Financial Innovation at MIT

2014

  • Andrea Ippolito G

2013

  • Elliot Cohen G, Allen Cheng G, Allison Yost G - Hacking Medicine
  • William F. Whitney ’13 - StartLabs
  • Colin Sidoti ’14 - Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Support and Outreach

2012

  • Akshar Wunnava '14
  • Application of Advanced Entrepreneurial Techniques 15.S24
 

Patrick J. McGovern, Jr. earned an S.B. in quantitative biology from MIT in 1959. His interest in life sciences focused especially on neurophysiology and the organization and function of the human nervous system. In 1964, he founded International Data Group, which grew into the world’s leading computer publishing firm responsible for hundreds of newspapers and magazines with a truly global reach. Mr. McGovern has maintained close ties with the Institute and has been a member of the MIT Corporation since 1989. In 2001, he and his wife Lore Harp McGovern became the largest donors ever to MIT with their pledge of $350 million to create and launch the McGovern Institute for Brain Research. In all his endeavors, Mr. McGovern has encouraged innovative methods for making high-tech ventures successful.

John S.W. Kellett '47 Award

The John S. W. Kellett ’47 Award recognizes any MIT individual or group for an exceptional and/or sustained commitment to creating a more welcoming environment at MIT, including but not limited to, improving the experience of lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender (LBGT), and questioning individuals.

The award honors Mr. Kellett, whose spirited support has enabled significant improvements in the lives of members of MIT’s LBGT community.

If you have any questions about the John S.W. Kellett '47 Award please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2017

  • Queer West

2016

  • Graduate Queer Women Group
    • Rebecca Heywood ’12 G
    • Audra Amasino G
    • Lakshmi Kannan G

2015

  • Margaret Lattanzi-Silveus ‘16

2014

  • Lincoln Laboratory Out Professional Employee Network (OPEN)

2013

  • Idan A. Blank G

2012

  • Cory Hernandez '14
 

John S. W. Kellett was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1927 and earned both an S.B. in chemical engineering (1947) and an S.M. in chemical engineering practice (1948) at MIT. He spent most of his career with Exxon focusing on refinery planning and project management. While he knew he was gay, he was closeted for most of his life. In 1972, when Exxon transferred him to Houston from overseas (the Stonewall Riots occurred during his absence and without his knowledge), he was determined to integrate the various aspects of his life and, later, to become an advocate for improving the experience of lesbian, bisexual, gay, and transgendered (LBGT) individuals. As his 50th reunion approached, he challenged MIT to examine its support of its LBGT community, resulting in the creation of the LBGT Issues Group, BGALA, and a broad spectrum of services. He continues to be a tireless advocate for these issues and an ongoing inspiration.

William L. Stewart, Jr. Award

The Stewart Awards are presented in memory of William L. Stewart, Jr., an alumnus and member of the Corporation who demonstrated deep interest in student life at MIT. The Stewart Awards recognize outstanding contributions by an individual student or student organization to extracurricular activities and events during the preceding year.

If you have any questions about the William L. Stewart, Jr. Award please contact via email.

Submit a nomination

Past Winners

2017

  • Sahar Dar G

2016

  • Katia Shtyrkova G
  • Eric Mannes ’16
  • Kath Xu ’16
  • Richard Watts ‘18

2015

  • Hal Anil '15
  • Phoebe Whitwell '15
  • Shreya Dave G

2014

  • Egypt Student Association
  • Anne Cai ‘14

2013

  • Ruth Byers'13
  • Joy Ekuta '13
  • Matthew Haberland G
  • Joanna S. Kao ‘13

2012

  • Ethan Solomon '12

 

 

William Lyman Stewart, Jr. first came to MIT as an undergraduate in 1919. He earned an S.B. in business and engineering administration in 1923. After graduation, he joined the Union Oil Company of California, to which he devoted his energies throughout his entire career. Long active in MIT affairs, he served as an alumni term member of the MIT Corporation from 1952 to 1956, and as a life member until his death. As a member of the Corporation, Mr. Stewart served on a number of standing and visiting committees including development, naval architecture, industrial management, humanities, mathematics, sponsored research, and student affairs.

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